File:Kepler186f-ComparisonGraphic-20140417 improved.jpg

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English: Kepler-186 and the Solar System

http://www.nasa.gov/ames/kepler/kepler-186-and-the-solar-system

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2014-119

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=PIA18000

The diagram compares the planets of our inner solar system to Kepler-186, a five-planet star system about 500 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus. The five planets of Kepler-186 orbit an M dwarf, a star that is is half the size and mass of the sun.

The Kepler-186 system is home to Kepler-186f, the first validated Earth-size planet orbiting a distant star in the habitable zone—a range of distance from a star where liquid water might pool on the planet's surface. The discovery of Kepler-186f confirms that Earth-size planets exist in the habitable zones of other stars and signals a significant step toward finding a world similar to Earth.

The size of Kepler-186f is known to be less ten percent larger than Earth, but its mass and composition are not known. Kepler-186f orbits its star once every 130 days, receiving one-third the heat energy that Earth does from the sun. This places the planet near the outer edge of the habitable zone.

The inner four companion planets each measure less than fifty percent the size of Earth. Kepler-186b, Kepler-186c, Kepler-186d and Kepler-186e, orbit every 4, 7, 13 and 22 days, respectively, making them very hot and inhospitable for life as we know it.

The Kepler space telescope infers the existence of a planet by the amount of starlight blocked when it passes in front of its star. From these data, a planet's radius, orbital period and the amount of energy recieved from the host star can be determined.

This derived version does not make any speculative assumptions of the actual appearance planet Kepler-186f itself, which therefore is displayed by a white ball, in deviation of the artistic and imaginative view of the original picture.
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Source This file was derived from: Kepler186f-ComparisonGraphic-20140417.jpgKepler186f-ComparisonGraphic-20140417.jpg
Author NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech

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Public domain This file is in the public domain in the United States because it was solely created by NASA. NASA copyright policy states that "NASA material is not protected by copyright unless noted". (See Template:PD-USGov, NASA copyright policy page or JPL Image Use Policy.)
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