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Simon Fraser University

As Canada’s engaged university, SFU works with communities, organizations and partners to create, share and embrace knowledge that improves life and generates real change. We deliver a world-class education with lifelong value that shapes change-makers, visionaries and problem-solvers. We connect research and innovation to entrepreneurship and industry to deliver sustainable, relevant solutions to today’s problems. With campuses in British Columbia’s three largest cities – Vancouver, Burnaby and Surrey – SFU has eight faculties that deliver 193 undergraduate degree programs and 127 graduate degree programs to more than 35,000 students. The university now boasts more than 160,000 alumni residing in 143 countries.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 249 articles

Older adults experiencing homelessness and housing insecurities are some of those most impacted by climate change. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

Better emergency preparedness can protect older adults from climate change

Governments and organizations must listen to older adults’ experiences with extreme heat, flooding and wildfire smoke to create effective policies and programs
Members of the Levica party march on a government building during a protest in Skopje, North Macedonia, on July 6, 2022. Thousands of people marched for several nights after French President Emmanuel Macron announced a proposal to enable the country’s admission into the EU that many North Macedonians find controversial. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski)

Why North Macedonia is the European Union’s latest self-inflicted wound

The EU is creating resentment in North Macedonia over its feud with Bulgaria. In the midst of the Russia-Ukraine war, it will only serve to benefit Russia in its efforts to undermine the EU.
Health-care workers in Toronto protest the Canadian truckers convoy last February that was against vaccine mandates. (Shutterstock)

Understanding why people reject science could lead to solutions for rebuilding trust

To communicate scientific findings that are relevant to the public, science communicators need to understand how to overcome attitudes that are anti-science.
With the so-called “freedom convoy” promising to return to Ottawa over the summer, its association with neo-fascist groups brings them back into the spotlight. (Shutterstock)

The Proud Boys disbanded over a year ago, but far-right extremism still exists in Canada

It’s been over a year since the Proud Boys were labelled a terrorist entity, but that hasn’t affected extremist activities in Canada.
If Canada wants to establish itself as a leading country in innovation, it has to invest in scientist-entrepreneurs and their projects. (Shutterstock)

Canada needs to invest more money into science innovation to help prevent the next global crisis

The key to supporting science innovation is funding and shaping it at its earliest stages, while innovative ventures are still housed within universities — and even before the ventures are founded.
Ontario Progressive Conservative Party Leader Doug Ford, Ontario New Democratic Party Leader Andrea Horwath, Ontario Liberal Party Leader Steven Del Duca and Green Party of Ontario Leader Mike Schreiner debate during the Ontario party leaders’ debate in May 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

The Ontario election campaign produced some surprisingly good ideas for Canada

Some excellent ideas were proposed during the Ontario election on everything from transit to housing. Here’s why the rest of Canada would be wise to consider them.
A demonstrator holds a pro-Ukraine sign during a protest against Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in Almaty, Kazakhstan — a former Soviet republic that has largely stayed neutral during the conflict — in March 2022. (AP Photo/Vladimir Tretyakov)

3 ways Vladimir Putin’s war in Ukraine is affecting the former Soviet region

The war in Ukraine is a seismic event. A weakened Russia will try to take advantage of a poorer, more divided and less secure post-Soviet region.
U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken speaks during the International Migration Review Forum on May 19, 2022, at United Nations headquarters in New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Western countries demand Russia follows international law – so why don’t they?

The West isn’t exactly diligent about following international rules of law. It conveniently ignores or sidesteps global rules-based order when it’s convenient.
Dodos have been extinct for centuries, but it’s not a simple matter to definitively designate a species as extinct. (Shutterstock)

When is a species really extinct?

Species are declared extinct when there have been no verifiable sightings for 50 years. Declaring a species extinct has implications for conservation efforts and policies.
Google’s search results often misidentify controversial characters, potentially contributing to the spread of misinformation. (Nathana Rebouças/Unsplash)

Language matters when Googling controversial people

Google search algorithms often pull up misleading descriptors for controversial people, and results can differ across languages. Understanding how these algorithms function can address misinformation.
Bosnian Serbs march carrying a giant Serbian flag in Sarajevo, Bosnia, on Jan. 9, 2022. The country’s Serbs celebrated an outlawed holiday with a provocative parade showcasing armored vehicles, police helicopters and law enforcement officers with rifles. (AP Photo)

Bosnia-Herzegovina could be the next site of Russian-fuelled conflict

Russia’s future influence on global affairs may not be limited to Ukraine — it may run through Bosnia-Herzegovina. To understand why, we need to think about how past conflicts shape today’s politics.

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