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Articles on St. Lawrence River: In Depth

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Riverbanks are reinforced to reduce flood risks, but these techniques reduce biodiversity and limit public accessibility. (Shutterstock)

We must rethink the way we build along the St. Lawrence River

The sustainable and inclusive development of the St. Lawrence River is essential. A prolonged laissez-faire attitude will have harmful consequences on people and the environment.
A study showed that an endangered population of beluga whales in the St. Lawrence River had one of the world’s highest concentrations of the flame retardant, PBDE, in their blubber. (Shutterstock)

Banned flame retardants continue to accumulate in the St. Lawrence River and the whales and fish that live there

Flame retardants are added to consumer products — and end up in the environment and harming aquatic wildlife.
Exceptional high tides hit eastern Québec in 2010 and 2016. (Groupe Facebook Grandes Marées 2010)

Can scientists predict when the next exceptional high tide will occur along the St. Lawrence River?

Popular belief suggests the highest tides in the St. Lawrence River are reached around the equinoxes. In truth, they arrive close to the solstices.
The Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence is one of, if not the largest estuarine system on Earth. It plays an intrinsic role in the history of Canada and is the cradle of Quebec’s economy, and its identity. (Gwénaëlle Chaillou)

Why the St. Lawrence estuary is running out of breath

Climate change is causing the deep waters in parts of the St. Lawrence River to lose their oxygen, and it’s damaging the health of the ecosystem.

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