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University of New Brunswick

The University of New Brunswick was founded in 1785. Throughout our long history, we have influenced the future of thousands of scholars. UNB has helped shape the social and economic landscape of this country and beyond. With nearly 12,000 full-time students, the university offers 75 undergraduate, graduate, certificate or diploma programs and participates in over 30 different fields of graduate work and research. Our university is home to over 3,000 members of faculty and staff who participate in research world-wide.

Building on a tradition of excellence, the University of New Brunswick continues to work to give students the best possible education. By developing programs, increasing international ties, using the latest pedagogies and technologies, and building partnerships with business and governments, the University of New Brunswick is a leading national university.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 40 articles

Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Marco Mendicino holds a press conference in Ottawa in November 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada needs to build more affordable housing for newcomers

Addressing the housing issue by adopting a human right framework put Canada on an accelerated path to meet newcomer families’ housing needs.
Brenda Murphy is the 32nd lieutenant governor of New Brunswick. She was appointed Sept. 8, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Stephen MacGillivray

New Brunswick’s ruling that the lieutenant governor must be bilingual needs to be appealed, but not for the reasons you think

The federal government must appeal this ruling — not because it disagrees with it, but because such a consequential decision requires greater appreciation of the Crown and its constitutional nuances.
According to an IPCC analysis, planting trees can help keep global warming below 1.5 C. (Shutterstock)

Canada needs to cut carbon, not try to capture it

A tax credit for companies that invest in carbon capture technology would divert financing away from cheaper and safer climate solutions.
People gather in Kingston, Ont., to protest COVID-19 vaccine mandates and masking measures on Nov. 14, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg 

COVID-19 vaccine mandates would likely face legal hurdles in Canada

Can the government mandate vaccines? Canadians have rights to make decisions about vaccination, but these rights are not absolute, and do not mean those decisions will have no consequences.
New Brunswick Aboriginal Affairs Minister Arlene Dunn and Premier Blaine Higgs speak with the media as part of National Indigenous Peoples Day in Fredericton on June 21, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Stephen MacGillivray

New Brunswick ban on land acknowledgements is a death blow to nation-to-nation relationships

If senior ministers of the Crown in New Brunswick responsible for Indigenous relations cannot accept or acknowledge Indigenous sovereignty, then surely nation-to-nation must be dead.
Purge survivors, at the Fredericton, N.B., Pride Parade in 2018. (Boom! Nightclub)

Discrimination against LGBTQ+ soldiers doesn’t stop just because a policy has been revoked

The Canadian Armed Forces is struggling with sexual misconduct allegations and poor inclusion and diversity. It is imperative to again document the stories of LGBTQ+ soldiers and their spouses.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford walks to his office in June 2020 as legislators debated the government’s legislation that enabled it to invoke the notwithstanding clause. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Notwithstanding the notwithstanding clause, the Charter is everyone’s business

By paying greater attention to the originally intended application of the Canadian Constitution’s notwithstanding clause, along with the diversity of lawmakers in Canada, there’s a better path forward.
Hospital support workers wave to cars honking their horns in support as the protest inequality for essential workers at Rouge Valley Hospital in Toronto in June 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Governments shouldn’t shield essential workers from COVID-19 lawsuits

Provinces shouldn’t prevent Canadians from seeking compensation if an essential service provider’s unreasonable acts cause COVID-19 infection.
Australia’s move to increase fees for some university humanities courses reflects global trends towards market-friendly education that overlook what’s needed for human flourishing. Here, the University of Sydney. (Eriksson Luo/Unsplash)

Stop telling students to study STEM instead of humanities for the post-coronavirus world

Today’s urgent inequality and environmental crises mean that more, not fewer, students should be studying history.
After a six-month delay, the Supreme Court of Canada is hearing arguments against the federal carbon pricing system. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Supreme Court case on carbon price is about climate change, not the Constitution

The Paris climate change agreement aims to limit global warming to 1.5C above pre-industrial temperatures — and the federal carbon pricing plan was meant to help Canada meet its commitments.
A person bicycles past the University of Toronto campus during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto in June 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

COVID-19: Don’t make university students choose between education and legal rights

Students won’t be allowed to participate in activities at St. Francis Xavier University this fall unless they sign a COVID-19 waiver. That’s forcing them to make a difficult and unfair choice.

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